Okay, so we last left off with me mountng the rear body. Here is a pic of the original rear Lincoln frame mount hole with some new "Energy Suspension" universal poly bushings I bought from Summit. I was able to bolt the Merc body on to the original '88 Lincoln frame section. First, I had to remove about 7" of the '88 Lincoln frame and weld it back together.
Okay, so we last left off with me mountng the rear body. Here is a pic of the original rear Lincoln frame mount hole with some new "Energy Suspension" universal poly bushings I bought from Summit. I was able to bolt the Merc body on to the original '88 Lincoln frame section. First, I had to remove about 7" of the '88 Lincoln frame and weld it back together.
Okay, so we last left off with me mountng the rear body. Here is a pic of the original rear Lincoln frame mount hole with some new "Energy Suspension" universal poly bushings I bought from Summit. I was able to bolt the Merc body on to the original '88 Lincoln frame section. First, I had to remove about 7" of the '88 Lincoln frame and weld it back together.
Okay, so we last left off with me mountng the rear body. Here is a pic of the original rear Lincoln frame mount hole with some new "Energy Suspension" universal poly bushings I bought from Summit. I was able to bolt the Merc body on to the original '88 Lincoln frame section. First, I had to remove about 7" of the '88 Lincoln frame and weld it back together.
Below: Here it is, all welded in and the new bushings installed. I had to "Z" the frame and re-weld it in place a bit to have it come out lower than the actual '88 Lincoln frame, yet still line up with the mount points in the stock '51 Mercury body.
Above: Overall shot showing completed new body mounts. It came out pretty well, the Lincoln stuff wasn't that far off from the original Merc locations.
Above: Another shot of how I welded and boxed the frame modifications.
Next up, replace those rotted-out end sections of the rear body mount braces:
My buddy Marc hand fabbed the end pieces that would replace the originals, which support a part of the trunk floor as well. You can see them temporarily-clamped in before welding:
Here is the finished section, clamped in place before final welding.
Another shot, from below, this was done to each side of the trunk brace:
Next, it was on to finishing up the trunk flooring. We had to shorten the factory Lincoln trunk pan, and re-weld it all back into place to mate up with the Mercury body, making filler pieces that resembled a jigsaw puzzle. Again, my buddy Marc took on this task and came thru with flying colors:
Passenger side, looking from inside of trunk:
And here is Marc displaying his finished "map" piece ready to weld in:
Here is the strip of trunk floor we had to remove to shorten the Lincoln to match the Merc:
Next it was on to mounting up the S-10 Steering column. Ironically, the Chevy column fit the stock Lincoln steering shaft, it was the same "double D" design. So, it physically fit onto the stock setup, I just had to come up with a way to mount the column under the dash. I bought a stock S-10 bracket, and grafted it to the stock Lincoln bracket that also held up the brake pedal. About a 1/2 hour of cutting and welding got me a bracket that would bolt up to the dash and firewall, and also support the GM column:
The area in red shows the final modified bracket, bolted up, with the steering column attached:
The firewall was tackled next, before the new crate 302 could go in. There was a void between the Mercury firewall and the Lincoln firewall, where I left a portion of the original Lincoln intact to support the brake booster and steering linkage hole. Like the trunk, it was a matter of cut and weld in a bunch of patch pieces like a jigsaw puzzle. Marc worked his magic here welding and cutting, and I did the final filler/primer/paint work:
Notice the top corner, a weird compound curve presented a challenge. Marc had an old '51 Ford truck bumper piece that he brought over...and as luck would have it, it had the right contour to finish the patch. See below:
Here's the bumper part missing the section we needed:
And here it is welded in:
Next to be filled in was the trans hump area:
Engine bay side:
On the inside: we used a piece of the original Merc trans tunnel and cut it to fit the contours of both surfaces...the rest we hand-formed.
While all this work was going on, I was getting the new crate engine prepped for install. I bought a 2001 302 crate engine off someone on Craigslist.org. It was still on the factory shipping crate. Supposedly, it had been a Roush engine, used for testing. It has the GT-40P heads. It is a roller motor. It was a fuel injected long block, minus intake and accessories...so it took some detective work to convert it over from F.I. to a carb. Once I tracked down all the bits and pieces I needed, I shot it in a 2006 Corvette basecoat/clearcoat color I liked.
Here it is assembled and painted. Valve covers came from Canton Racing products, they had "the look":
Look how new and clean this engine is on the inside- this is a view of the crank and pistons:
Before and after of the naked engine bay, completed firewall, and painted frame:
Here is a shot of the finished firewall with the engine in place:
After we got this far, life got in the way. I put the front sheetmetal back on, and tried to figure out what kind of radiator setup I would have to come up with- not much room to work with. Next project- fab up a core support to mount the fenders and radiator since I can't use the old stuff or the new stuff:
During all this, I re-engineered the fuel pump pickup, converting it over from a fuel-injected pump to a standard pickup that could be used with a carb and a standard mechanical fuel pump. I took off the electric pump, bent up some brake line, added some fuel proof hose, and re-plumbed it and re-installed the "sock" filter. Should work fine.
So, that brings us all up to date as of (11-18-2006)
Dizzy is by Petronix.
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